Never let the future disturb you. You will meet it, if you have to, with the same weapons of reason which today arm you against the present

Friday, 30 April 2010

Charity begins at home ...


I have learned now that while those who speak about one’s troubles usually hurt, those who keep silence hurt more.

Emotional rescue for doctors who cannot heal themselves


"The steel-framed door tucked between a Tesco and a hardware shop on a busy South London street is neat and anonymous. And for doctors such as John who pass through it, safe in the knowledge that their confidences will be protected, it is the salvation from years, if not decades, of chaotic health battles fought in silence ...

"The doctor describes his years of alcohol and drug abuse as an exercise in personal and professional self-denial, fuelled in part by a health service that struggles to help its own practitioners when they need it most "

The article then goes to describe how some doctors of all ages go on suffering from minor depression to developing dependancy on alcohol - and sometimes illegal drugs, in a desperate attempt to help themselves without being found out!

"the greatest fear about being logged in the system was that he might come under the scrutiny of the General Medical Council, the professional regulator. "

Ah! ... here is the ferocious monster again!

Medicine is a compassionate vocation, yes! But it is also the most stressful vocation too; having to deal with death and disease on a daily basis throughout a doctor's career which spans around 40 of the best years of their life! Denying that this won't cause side effects on each and every doctor at one time or another in their lives is like hiding one's head in the sand to avoid seeing the truth and why things sometimes get out of hand for those who suffer in silence.

No wonder the highest suicide rates among professionals are those involving doctors!

You know, this article describes, not only how doctors suffer in silence because people in general do not expect doctors to hurt sometimes like everybody else; well, how can they?! They are doctors after all! ... but how their own regulators expects them to be super beings too! ... and hence, does not allow for any degree of humanity ... but, I think this is also a neat and very real explanation of how the Drs Shipman of this world are made!

Too much pressure will break the hardest of substances ... but the GMC, who seems to be on mission 'I am here to get you any which way I can' seems to also be ignorant to that truth! Not right!

I don't really know much about this organisation, apart from what I read around the blogosphere as well as articles like this above - but from what I've learnt so far, I think that at a time when 'prevention' is the talk of the town; that fear of the GMC monster should be the first thing to tackle if we are to heal our healers so that they can heal us! So ...

Before you revalidate doctors, revalidate this organisation!

They need to realise a 'fundamental basic' that;

Charity begins at home!

Only for doctors who dare be human, home is currently an anonymous "steel-framed door tucked between a Tesco and a hardware shop on a busy South London street!"

... and this post is just a touching on what is a very big and very real 'anonymous' subject! :-(





How can I follow my heart when it's waiting around for the rest of me to make the decision?


Tuesday, 27 April 2010

Live ... at a theatre near you Now! @@

"It began as this desire to do this science fiction movie about perhaps one of the last insects left that nobody's done anything on, which is the cockroach - and truly one of the most frightening insects. "

@@







Things got out of hand when a surgical experiment to use Cockroaches to extract diseased organs through natural orfices goes horribly wrong! The aim was to cause the patient less pain, which means earlier mobility, and quicker return to work, but the vile insects, in their droves, are now attacking the sleeping naked patient in theatre. yikes!

Preplexed, his surgeon tries to use the mouse to swat these disgusting bugs and kill the most to save the patient but too many of them enter the patient's unstable places and he goes nuts ....

... the patient wakes up and goes nuts too ... yet he can't move! @@

YUCK!

Anyone with a good pair of slippers? .... Pleeeeease!


... or is it Game Over for this patient?!
:-(



"The Alien is gross, scary. There is something in a human being that looks at them and sees it as a cockroach. You can never feel nurturing towards the cockroach."












- Are you serious?!
- About what I do, yes! ... Not necessarily the way I do it!

:-)


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Friday, 23 April 2010

Kalila wa Demna ... :-)

"One should seek for the salutary in the unpleasant: if it is there, it is after all nectar. One should seek for the deceitful in the pleasant: if it is there it is after all poison." The Panchatantra

Well, here, here boys and girls, gather around now, for I have a magical story to tell ...

.... Once upon a time, there was a colony of geese and a tortoise, all living happily under the sun by a big lake full of fish ... but then they were greedy, they ate and ate whether they were hungry or not, until all the fishes were gone! No use crying now, for they should've known that eating too much will only finish all the fish in the sea sooner or later ... and so when all the fish had gone, and after a few days crying by day ... and sobbing by night, they were all very hungery. So they sat together by the empty lake thinking what to do ... after a long wait, the geese came up with a solution ... they would fly away and land by another spot by the sea where fish are still a plenty ... and as they have now learned their lesson, they would not be as greedy, but will take care and eat only what they need and allow the rest of fish to breed and multiply. This way, they would have an endless supply of delicious juicy fish and live happily by the good lake .. under the sun .. forever after ...

"Good idea", said the tortoise, "But how about me? I can't fly!"

"We forgot about that! He can't fly!" Said one goose "What to do now? We can't leave him here! He'd die for sure!"

They hadn't thought about that ... and so, everybody sat together again .. thinking and thinking of what to do to save the tortoise ... suns came and moons went by with the geese and the tortoise discussing and deliberating ... until ...

"Eureka!" "We found 'the' solution!", said the head goose to the tortoise .. " We'll carry you with a bamboo stick and hold the ends with our peaks and, providing you hold on tight to the stick with your teeth and do not attempt to talk for any reason or else you'd fall, you can fly away with us and be saved too"

"Brilliant idea", said the now happy tortoise, " I will hold on as tight as can be .. and nothing will make me talk ... Nothing!"

But then when they were up in the sky, the sight of the tortoise flying amidst all the geese made all the other birds flying about laugh, then make silly comments about how silly and stupid this holding on to the stick looks to them ... at the beginning, the tortoise pretended that he didn't hear them, but when more and more birds gathered around to look, he could no longer take all their sarcasm and opened his mouse to tell them off! ... and, alas! The poor tortoise fell to his death!

And now,
O mighty master,
mark it well.

See thou speak wisely,
see thou speak in season.

To death the Tortoise fell:

He talked too much:
that was the reason.


This story is from 'The Jakata', a Buddhist collection of fables based on the previous lives of Buddha. But it's orgins are from the Indian Panchatantra, written in Sanskrit, it was the first known narrative depicting fictional stories with speech on the tongues of animals. The Panchtantra also interacted different animals as if they were living in a human society with all it's complications, the good and bad as well as the wisdom this 'living together' experience always brings. Although it was meant to form a magical story line for children, the real aim of the many stories was to critcise the leaders and rulers of the time during the 3rd century BC as well as pose moral problems and conclude in a wisdom for everybody to learn ... above is one moral of The tortoise and The Geese story, although the story has many..

The Panchatantra became so popular at the time that it's reputation reached the neighbouring countries. Two hundred years later the Arab scholar Abd Allah ibn Al-Muqaffa', a Persian convert to Islam who lived in Basra, Iraq. He translated the fables from Pahlavi into Arabic, under the title Kalilah wa-Dimnah. Using both prose and verse in his translations, Ibn Al- Muqaffa' was also on of the most able writers and poets of his time, he added some of his own fables as well as alter some of the original text and add to it by way of enhancing the complexity of the story line, adding man/bird interaction and improving the dialogue overall to maximise the story's moral lessons and effect. Hence the reason why his version way surpassed the original and enjoyed great popularity throughout the Middle East and was itself translated into different languages, including late Syriac, Hebrew, modern Persian, and Turkish. By 1600 BC, Kalilah wa Demna was a major sucess in Europe too, it was translated into many European languages including English.


Was the original Panchatantra or "the wise conduct of life" the basis of the modern masterpiece Animal Farm by George Orwell as Kalila wa Demna was, or was it the more modern Arabic version masterpiece that inspired Orwell? His too, like the much bigger and much more varied and comprehensive Kalilah and Dimnah, appeals to readers for its lively depiction of the animal kingdom as analogous to the human world and for its practical morality .... the reason for it's great success ... :-)

... But that's not all! For Egypt has to have an influence on all this glorious, glamorous and very opulent mystique, right? Let's go back in history then, for wasn't it the Egyptians who first used the physique as well as qualities of animals to make figures to resemble their gods? And those could speak too, you know! ... and who can ever be wiser, or can teach you proper, even punish you, than your own gods?! ... those were nice sometimes and really, really harsh on other times, and sometimes they were ferocious .. whenever needed! .... some, like the Sphinx, a wise guardian and protector, had a human head on an animal's body; a lion in this case. One that was ready to leap at any time and really make a feast of those who dare attack whatever he sat guarding!

Then, many gods had animal heads on human bodies, including Horus, who had a falcon head ... remember him? ... he was nice, but you wouldn't want to know him when he showed his other side! For he could dive in a flash down from the skies and start great big wars! so, he wasn't always, always so nice! ... you can't be if you're a god needing to punish those who disobey .. and a teacher who needs to educate by example, can you?!

This one right above is Set, the Frankenstien of all ancient Egyptian dieties and god of chaos!

Maybe I can tell you about him later ... naughty, naughty ... boy? .. animal/s? ... God? ... whatever! ... what a mess!

Was George Orwell aware of this connection? I don't know ...

Tell you what? Forget about all this for now and let's watch a bit of rare ... that of original history ... that of Ibn Al-Muqaffa's Arabic Kalila wa Demna ... Enjoy :-)




"Knowledge is the true organ of sight, not the eyes." K&D

Monday, 19 April 2010

The Panchatantra ...


"Knowledge is the true organ of sight, not the eyes." The Panchatantra

Well, here boys and girls, gather around now, for I have a magical story to tell ...

Once upon a time there was a colony of geese and a tortoise, living happily under the sun by a big lake full of fish ... but then they were greedy, they ate and ate wheather they were hungry or not, until all the fishes were gone! No use crying now, for they should've known that eating too much will only finish all the fish in the sea sooner or later ... and so when all the fish had gone, and after a few days crying by day ... and sobbing by night, they were all very hungery. So they sat together by the empty sea thinking of what to do ... after a long wait, the geese came up with a solution ... they would fly away and land by another spot by the sea where fish are still a plenty ... by this time, they have now learned their lesson ... they wouldl not be as greedy, but lthey will take care and eat only what they need and allow the rest of fish to breed and multiply. This way, they would have an endless supply of delicious juicy fish and live happily by the good sea .. under the sun .. forever after ...

"Good idea", said the tortoise, "But how about me? I can't fly!"

"We forgot about that! He can't fly!" Said one goose "What to do now? We can't leave him here! He'd die for sure!"

They hadn't thought about that ... and so, everybody sat together again .. thinking and thinking, of what to do to save the tortoise ... suns came and moons went by with the geese and the tortoise discussing and deliberating ... until ...

"Eureka!" "We found 'the' solution!", said the head goose to the tortoise .. " We will carry you with a bamboo stick and hold the ends with our peaks and, providing you hold on tight to the stick with your teeth and do not talk for any reason, you can fly away with us and be saved too"

"Brilliant idea", said the now happy tortoise, " I will hold on as tight as can be .. and nothing will make me talk ... Nothing!"

But then when they were up in the sky, the sight of the tortoise flying amidst all the geese made the other birds laugh, then comment on how silly and stupid this holding on to the stick looks ... at the beginning, the tortoise pretended that he didn't hear them, but when more and more birds gathered around them to look, he could no longer take all their sarcasm and opened his mouse to tell them off! ... and fell to his death!

And now,
O mighty master,
mark it well.

See thou speak wisely,
see thou speak in season.

To death the Tortoise fell:

He talked too much:
that was the reason.


This story is from 'The Jakata', a Buddhist collection of fables based on the previous lives of Buddha. But it's orgins are from the Indian Panchatantra, the first known narrative depicting fictional speech on the tongues of animals. The Panchtantra also interacted different animals as if they were living in a human society with all it's complications, the good and bad as well as the wisdom this 'living together' experience always brings. Although it was meant to form a magical story line for children, the real aim of the many stories was to critcise the leaders and rulers of the time during the 3rd century BC as well as pose moral problems and conclude in a wisdom for everybody to learn ... above is one moral of The tortoise and The Geese story, although the story has many..

The Panchatantra became so popular at the time that it's reputation reached the neighbouring countries. Two hundred years later the Arab scholar Abd Allah ibn Al-Muqaffa', a Persian convert to Islam who lived in Basra, Iraq. He translated the fables from Pahlavi into Arabic, under the title Kalilah wa-Dimnah. Using both prose and verse in his translations, Ibn Al- Muqaffa' was also on of the most able writers and poets of his time, he added some of his own fables as well as alter some of the original text and add to it by way of enhancing the story line, add man/bird interaction and improve the dialogue to maximise the story's moral effect. Hence the reason why his version surpassed the original and enjoyed great popularity throughout the Middle East and was itself translated into different languages, including late Syriac, Hebrew, modern Persian, and Turkish. By 1600 BC, Kalilah wa Demna was a major sucess in Europe too, it was translated into many European languages including English.


Was the original Panchatantra or "the wise conduct of life" the basis of the modern masterpiece Animal Farm by George Orwell as Kalila wa Demna was, or was it the more modern Arabic version masterpiece that inspired Orwell? His too like the much bigger and much more varied and comprehensive Kalilah and Dimnah, appeals to readers for its lively depiction of the animal kingdom as analogous to the human world and for its practical morality .... hence it's great success ...

... But that's not all! For Egypt has to have an influence on all this glorious mystique, right? For wasn't it the Egyptians who first used animal figures to even resemble their gods?! And those could speak too, you know! ... and who is wiser, or can teach you proper, even punish you, than your own gods?! ... they were nice sometimes and really, really harsh other times, they were ferocious! .... and many of those had animal heads on human bodies, including Horus, who had a falcon head ... remember? ... and you don't know his other side ... he wasn't always, always so nice! ... you can't be if you're a god .. and a teacher, can you?!

This one right above is Set, the Frankenstien of all ancient Egyptian dieties and god of chaos!

Maybe I can tell you about him later ... naughty, naughty ... boy? .. animal/s? ... God? ... whatever! ... what a mess!

Tell you what? Forget about him for now and let's watch a bit rare ... that of original history ... the Arabic Kalila wa Demna ... Enjoy :-)


"One should seek for the salutary in the unpleasant: if it is there, it is after all nectar. One should seek for the deceitful in the pleasant: if it is there it is after all poison." The Panchatantra



"In a time of universal deciet telling the truth is a revolutionary act" Animal Farm :-)